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Stringing Information: Welcome to the Stringing Information page! Information below are views and opinions of iStringing members. We are not sponsored by any company and are not affliated with any company/manufacturer. We will update this page periodically with new information about stringing and anything that involves racquets.

Strings:
There have been a lot of Hype about polyester strings in the past few years.  Polyester strings are not for everyone.  Just because a Pro uses polyester doesn't make it the perfect string for a recreational player.  Bear in mind that Pros normally change their strings after every match, so they never play with a "dead" string, whereas recreational players sometimes do not change their strings for a year or until they break.  Strings lose their elasticity (ability to return to their normal state) create more vibration, causing more shock to the arm.  Older strings also lose their tension, causing you to lose control of the ball and creating more power than you can control.  So what string is best for you?  This depends on your strokes and lots of other factors.  Some questions that we would ask you when determining which string is best for you are:

How often do you break strings?
How much do you want to spend on strings?
What level do you play (NTRP rating)?
What type of strokes do you have? (flat, spin, slices)
What type of game do you play? (all-court, serve-volley, baseliner, etc..)
How often do you play?

After answering a few of these questions, we should be able to select a few strings for you to try.

How often should you change your strings?  There is no set rule or formula for how long a string lasts.  Usually depending on weather, how often do you play, what type of player you are, who you hit against, whether you play singles or doubles, match play or rallying, what string you use and tension, etc etc.  Some strings drop their tension significantly within 8 hours of play while others will last 15.  Best way to test your strings is using a Beers ERT 300.  This gadget tests your stringbed after stringing and gives you a DT (dynamic tension).  If you measure the DT right after stringing and compare the DT after playing for a few hours, you will be able to tell how much tension was lost.  You should restring if you lose 15-20%. 

Tennis Elbow: 
Tennis Elbow is one of the most common ailments in tennis.  There are several ways to help prevent or reduce tennis elbow injuries.  
Soft strings will help absorb the impact of the ball and transfer less shock to the arm. Natural  Gut is the best string out there to help tennis elbow, followed by multifilament strings.  If you have tennis elbow, you should steer clear of polyester and kevlar.  
Restring frequently.  Restringing before your strings are dead helps reduce the harsh impacts of the ball.  Strings lose their resiliency and elasticity over time.  This will relate to more vibration to the arm.  Knowing when to restring is a crucial part in the fight against tennis elbow!
Lowering your tension will reduce the amount of shock transferred to your elbow as well.  Dropping the tension not only creates less shock, but will feel better on off center hits.  
A more flexible racquet helps absorb the impact of the ball and transfer less shock to the arm. Many racquets on the market today are over 70 flex (RDC rating).  They are very stiff and will transfer a large amount of shock to the arm if the ball is struck off center. Racquets range from the low 50s to high 70s in stiffness.
Hitting the ball early and using the correct form will help tremendously.  Taking a few lessons will help minimize tennis elbow by showing you how to prepare, step up and strike the ball.
Using a bigger grip will help reduce torque on off center hits.
Change your grip often!  Nothing worse than a dirty, worn grip slipping in your hands.  

2 Piece vs 1 Piece string jobs:
As you may or may not know..there are several ways to string a racquet.  The main two ways are to use 1 piece (two knots) or 2 pieces (four knots).  We string 2 piece unless told otherwise for several reasons. When stringing, you always want to do "Top Down" stringing, meaning you want to string the crosses from the head of the racquet to the throat.  This reduces the stress on the racquet and reduces unneeded strain on the racquet during the stringing process.  With 2 piece, we can always string Top Down.  
2 piece stringings also provide a more consistent stringbed.  When stringing 1 piece, there is a short side.  When this short side is tied off..there is an amount of tension loss resulting in the tie off.  As a result, one side of the racquet will feel looser than the other side.  Whereas in 2 piece, both sides of the racquet will feel the same.
Some manufacturers require 2 piece string jobs.  Head and Yonex are 2 main manufacturers that request and require 2 piece string jobs on most of their racquets. Stringing 1 piece can actually void the racquet warranty.
Stringing 1 piece when the mains end at the throat would require you to do an Around The World (ATW) pattern so you can string Top Down.  There are several ways to do ATW which causes different feel in the stringbed.  Stringing 2 pieces would minimize the inconsistencies and allow us to string the racquet almost the same every single time.


Grips:
We have been testing various overgrips throughout the years..Here is what we found: This chart is on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the highest.

 

Absorbancy 

Tackyness 

 Durability

 Thickness

Tourna Grip Original

9

 3

4

6

 Yonex Supergrap

7

6

4

5

 Gamma Supreme

2

9

8

9

 Babolat Pro Tour

7

6

7

5

 Babolat VS

6

6

3

2

Wilson Pro

7

6

5

5


For people who sweat on their hands a lot, Tournagrip is the way to go for a dry feel.
People who sweat and like a tacky feel, Babolat Pro Tour is a great grip to try.
Those who do not sweat and like a tacky feel, Gamma Supreme Overgrip is a great grip for you!
Babolat VS is a great grip if you want an ultra thin overgrip.

Disclaimer: Please inspect racquets prior to and after stringing. iStringing.com members are not liable for any damages to and from the use of the racquet after stringing.
Contact Information


Address:
8804 Las Tunas Drive
Temple City, CA 91780

Hours:
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Closed 2pm-4pm Monday-Friday

Email:
questions@istringing.com

Phone:
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